Random music posts

Other music and recommendations.

Moderators: tom_cas1, Caitlin, MrMagpie

User avatar
AdvertBreak
Posts: 5571
Joined: 24 Jan 2015, 17:34
Location: Gorgeous Wiltshire

Re: Random music posts

Post by AdvertBreak » 01 Jul 2016, 04:28

Mallard No. 22 wrote:
KingLouieLouie76 wrote:Another random topic....1997 was such a wonderful year's worth of music! It was Post-Grunge, but several other genres really began emerging onto the scene, some were just short-lived though.... 1998 the music industry was beginning to go into some flux phase and hasn't to me fully recovered since.
Good point. Indie music post-Britpop was largely killed-off by the industry, lots of artists had their contracts terminated overnight.
You've both made very shocking claims there. Firstly 1997 was indeed a fantastic year for music (and none of it was post-grunge :P ) and that's an endless conversation in itself, but I feel you are both dangerously generalising here. The music industry accounts for all music released, so are you literally saying that 1998 onwards has been a flux state for music? Objectively far from it. And indie music has never stopped being a large thing since it first appeared in the 80s - indeed many Britpop bands had their contracts swallowed but that's because they stopped selling records and they were signed to corporate labels who work commercially rather than on heart or whatever.

User avatar
KingLouieLouie76
Posts: 3219
Joined: 10 Sep 2014, 03:51
Location: Phoenix, AZ (USA)
Contact:

Re: Random music posts

Post by KingLouieLouie76 » 02 Jul 2016, 07:19

AdvertBreak wrote:
You've both made very shocking claims there. Firstly 1997 was indeed a fantastic year for music (and none of it was post-grunge :P ) and that's an endless conversation in itself, but I feel you are both dangerously generalising here. The music industry accounts for all music released, so are you literally saying that 1998 onwards has been a flux state for music? Objectively far from it. And indie music has never stopped being a large thing since it first appeared in the 80s - indeed many Britpop bands had their contracts swallowed but that's because they stopped selling records and they were signed to corporate labels who work commercially rather than on heart or whatever.
First, you're around 20 years-old? The reason why I ask is that I was 20 in 1997, but the most hilarious fact was that during that time I was also heavily immersing myself in Classic Rock and I wished that I grew-up in later 60s London instead of the that particular time period. However, over this past decade I realized how fortunate I was to have existed throughout the 90s, especially starting that decade at 13 and ending it at 23....... Just the overall vibe was sensational and to have such a strong movement as Grunge really helped embody that spirit that the Psychedelic era did. I took a lot of that for granted back then, but I actually embraced all of it at the same time.

When I say in flux....I'm getting at innovation....I'm getting at a communal sense... especially globally.... there was a global appreciation of music in the 60s and 90s and it has lacked in that regards since. We the posters on this forum are the rare breed since we share such a mutual musical interest on a global scale, but otherwise it is so rare now. Nothing all too unifying.

1998 represented a time though in which even Swing music became popular again, but what I havent liked over the past 15 years is the emergence of these Boy Bands, those from American Idol, or others of that ilk who have cashed in due to image and nothing else. No substance in their music and that is what is most disheartening to me. I love today's Indie scene, but unfortunately the trite mainstream BS ruins most of everything to me. I miss innovation, I miss some unifying defining sound. Something is bound to change in that regards soon... just based on trends throughout time.
Image

User avatar
Mallard No. 22
Posts: 2433
Joined: 01 Oct 2014, 07:46
Location: North East UK

Re: Random music posts

Post by Mallard No. 22 » 02 Jul 2016, 08:09

KingLouieLouie76 wrote:
AdvertBreak wrote:
You've both made very shocking claims there. Firstly 1997 was indeed a fantastic year for music (and none of it was post-grunge :P ) and that's an endless conversation in itself, but I feel you are both dangerously generalising here. The music industry accounts for all music released, so are you literally saying that 1998 onwards has been a flux state for music? Objectively far from it. And indie music has never stopped being a large thing since it first appeared in the 80s - indeed many Britpop bands had their contracts swallowed but that's because they stopped selling records and they were signed to corporate labels who work commercially rather than on heart or whatever.
1998 represented a time though in which even Swing music became popular again, but what I haven't liked over the past 15 years is the emergence of these Boy Bands, those from American Idol, or others of that ilk who have cashed in due to image and nothing else. No substance in their music and that is what is most disheartening to me. I love today's Indie scene, but unfortunately the trite mainstream BS ruins most of everything to me. I miss innovation, I miss some unifying defining sound. Something is bound to change in that regards soon... just based on trends throughout time.
Yes to be fair good music has continued after the 90s, and we are made aware of great new songs now on stations like BBC 6Music, and indeed via this forum.

But there was a certain vibe around the 90s indie scene, which eventually went overground, that was lost as Britpop was briskly spirited away.

As KLL76 says, the emergence of the reality TV teen-type acts has been prevalent ever since. It would be unfair to say they are all bad, but they often lack soul or substance. And even rock acts like Tame Impala - I sometimes think they are as much picked for their 'model' looks as their music. I worry that if an act emerged today with members like Alex James or Paul McGuigan (as they were in the 90s) they might not get record deals. :cry:
"Everybody's Doing It...So Do It Too...."

User avatar
AdvertBreak
Posts: 5571
Joined: 24 Jan 2015, 17:34
Location: Gorgeous Wiltshire

Re: Random music posts

Post by AdvertBreak » 03 Jul 2016, 04:28

I'm a bit drunk but whatever.
I don't want to be rude, but I disagree with a lot here.

My first point addresses music here in the UK.
1998? Anything huge happening in the UK music...No shit! Garage. UK garage, 2-step garage. Second wave jungle/dnb. And, as should be needless to say, these weren't "fads" or whatever, these were thriving, devoted scenes. Scenes that were split between different personalities, even. Different ages. Different styles. Innovations? Loads. Just listen to a song like Bound 4 Da Reload or Gunman and hear dubstep wobbles, "crime grime" sound effect/speech samples, etc. Long before they became well known in public ears. Independent UK pop music today has so much of its roots in this era. The many rappers and whatever. Grime came about because garage, etc. And this can easily be an unbelievably huge talk about garage. It really can. I mean heck, even close precedents like jungle were the mid-90s more so than Britpop, if we are really speaking about relevancy in UK pop music.

And that's just one aspect of it. Both of you are not focusing on music in general, or even acclaimed music, but on chart music (uh?)
KingLouieLouie76 wrote: When I say in flux....I'm getting at innovation....I'm getting at a communal sense... especially globally.... there was a global appreciation of music in the 60s and 90s and it has lacked in that regards since. We the posters on this forum are the rare breed since we share such a mutual musical interest on a global scale, but otherwise it is so rare now. Nothing all too unifying.
Well i've already explained how underground, innovative and communal music (whether it creeps into the mainstream, and it often has, or not, like it often doesn't) has always thrived with just one example in with Britain's garage and its successors. In America there were too movements in this era that were essential building blocks to American pop music. But you refer to 'global appreciation' in the 60s and 90s, and I really have no idea what you're getting at there. In the 60s I can kinda see what you mean, where the biggest bands in one country were the biggest bands in every country. By the 90s that was long since dead. You're going to have to explain what that means, because it makes no sense right now to me.
KingLouieLouie76 wrote:1998 represented a time though in which even Swing music became popular again, but what I havent liked over the past 15 years is the emergence of these Boy Bands, those from American Idol, or others of that ilk who have cashed in due to image and nothing else. No substance in their music and that is what is most disheartening to me.
A) Swing music popular again in 1998? Interesting observation but I can't think what music you mean. Certainly not a 'scene' or movement or anything.
B) Your second point there is something that happened LOOONG before the millennium. Prominent manufactured music is not the product of this century and obviously you know that too, so to me your point doesn't hold up. In neither the UK or US was this even a re-emergence but a continuation of before. At the turn of the millennium I know boy bands were in vogue in the states for the first time in almost a decade but take a look at the biggest-selling artists in 1990s America... In the UK I doubt you could have moved for the fuckers even during the heights of Britpop (Boyzone, Take That, etc.) Soulless pop acts always dominant or co-exist with others in the charts.
KingLouieLouie76 wrote:I love today's Indie scene, but unfortunately the trite mainstream BS ruins most of everything to me.
Then don't listen to the radio? (Not that indie music is ever on the radio anyway?) I don't understand how the existence of modern indie music is ruined by the existence of other, unrelated music. Indie music's format is not the same as modern pop music anyway (radio/tv/etc.)
KingLouieLouie76 wrote: I miss innovation, I miss some unifying defining sound. Something is bound to change in that regards soon... just based on trends throughout time.
There's loads of innovation thanks to ever changing production (electronic music really shines in this context, like Flying Lotus or James Blake, or experimental hip hop like Death Grpis etc.) And lots of emerging styles, as just this decade alone we've had underground movements in vaporwave, modern blackgaze, etc., even if they are indebted to past music (just like Britpop and grunge were).
Mainstream music, here in the UK at least, has completely drowned out 'alternative' music, not that it needs it though. I like your comment about a something bound to change soon, if you are referring to the mainstream. But the underground is just as restless as it always has been.
Mallard No. 22 wrote: Yes to be fair good music has continued after the 90s, and we are made aware of great new songs now on stations like BBC 6Music, and indeed via this forum.

But there was a certain vibe around the 90s indie scene, which eventually went overground, that was lost as Britpop was briskly spirited away.
What do you mean by the 90s indie scene? You're spanning 10 years of music there, and not necessarily British or American etc. And that accounts for an incredible amount of musical shifts and styles. As such I can't begin to really make sense of what you mean so please clarify. And yeah I think any sort of feeling when Britpop went away is likely a generational thing. I'm sure all the (much worse imo) popular/successful "indie" bands of 10 years later , which encapsulated that whole 'landfill indie' thing, was the last great spark for a generation 10 years younger. Just as I'm sure you'll get silly British indie purists saying that "indie" "sold out" in the late 80s or whatever.
Mallard No. 22 wrote: As KLL76 says, the emergence of the reality TV teen-type acts has been prevalent ever since. It would be unfair to say they are all bad, but they often lack soul or substance. And even rock acts like Tame Impala - I sometimes think they are as much picked for their 'model' looks as their music. I worry that if an act emerged today with members like Alex James or Paul McGuigan (as they were in the 90s) they might not get record deals. :cry:
I already covered the first point, but speaking Britain alone now, I can say that the 2000s had loads, loads of indie bands in the charts. Just as much as the 90s. And the 2000s had loads of 'soulless' pop acts...just as much as the 90s. So in referring the 2000s, your comment doesn't hold in my eyes. I don't pay attention to modern chart music but I get the impression that 'indie' music has, indeed, been less prevalent in the charts since, but I don't know why this should bother you or Louie, because today, access to modern indie music is more easy than it has ever been. I mean of course I can be sad that some bands don't become more successful or whatever, but for me what makes me much sadder is if they don't get the acclaim they deserve, and that has nothing to do with selling records. Commercial success is a fun game I'll explore in my every number 1 1987-08 series, and I'll sure moan that songs get successful whilst others are slighted, but the charts don't always reflect the qualities of a song - that's the business - so it's no real bother to me.
KingLouieLouie76 wrote: First, you're around 20 years-old? The reason why I ask is that I was 20 in 1997, but the most hilarious fact was that during that time I was also heavily immersing myself in Classic Rock and I wished that I grew-up in later 60s London instead of the that particular time period. However, over this past decade I realized how fortunate I was to have existed throughout the 90s, especially starting that decade at 13 and ending it at 23....... Just the overall vibe was sensational and to have such a strong movement as Grunge really helped embody that spirit that the Psychedelic era did. I took a lot of that for granted back then, but I actually embraced all of it at the same time.
Yeah I'm 18. My dad often jokes I'd liked to have grown up with "his music", but of course the reality is that I did grow up with "his music", and better yet, in such a way that I now have access to practically all music in the world. I indeed often listen to the music of the past and I do indeed think the musical pop culture (as opposed to underground music) of this decade that the public latch to is pretty faceless. Time will tell how well it holds up.

I better sober up.

User avatar
KingLouieLouie76
Posts: 3219
Joined: 10 Sep 2014, 03:51
Location: Phoenix, AZ (USA)
Contact:

Re: Random music posts

Post by KingLouieLouie76 » 03 Jul 2016, 07:08

AdvertBreak wrote:I'm a bit drunk but whatever.
I don't want to be rude, but I disagree with a lot here.

My first point addresses music here in the UK.
1998? Anything huge happening in the UK music...No shit! Garage. UK garage, 2-step garage. Second wave jungle/dnb. And, as should be needless to say, these weren't "fads" or whatever, these were thriving, devoted scenes. Scenes that were split between different personalities, even. Different ages. Different styles. Innovations? Loads. Just listen to a song like Bound 4 Da Reload or Gunman and hear dubstep wobbles, "crime grime" sound effect/speech samples, etc. Long before they became well known in public ears. Independent UK pop music today has so much of its roots in this era. The many rappers and whatever. Grime came about because garage, etc. And this can easily be an unbelievably huge talk about garage. It really can. I mean heck, even close precedents like jungle were the mid-90s more so than Britpop, if we are really speaking about relevancy in UK pop music.
Well, as you know I live in the States and unfortunately that "Garage" scene did not go across the pond sorta speak. I would actually appreciate if you pointed me in the proper direction of what other bands to check out (besides the ones you mentioned). I used to listen to some UK radio later last decade and was blown away how much better the quality of music on your airwaves was. But my point is right on how it hasn't been globally centric for the past couple of decades. Those UK bands aren't emerging here like they once did and we're being deprived.
AdvertBreak wrote:And that's just one aspect of it. Both of you are not focusing on music in general, or even acclaimed music, but on chart music (uh?)

Well i've already explained how underground, innovative and communal music (whether it creeps into the mainstream, and it often has, or not, like it often doesn't) has always thrived with just one example in with Britain's garage and its successors. In America there were too movements in this era that were essential building blocks to American pop music. But you refer to 'global appreciation' in the 60s and 90s, and I really have no idea what you're getting at there. In the 60s I can kinda see what you mean, where the biggest bands in one country were the biggest bands in every country. By the 90s that was long since dead. You're going to have to explain what that means, because it makes no sense right now to me.
Several bands from the States back down only mere cult followings still managed to make an impact abroad (including the UK) and conversely Britpop and other UK artists achieved that success here, but that seems to be lacking nowadays due to the lack of exposure or not having the means or vehicle necessary to be marketed effectively. I think our main issue between us two that we're both conflicted on what might have made even a slight dent in our respective music scenes. I even thought the Swing Revival was popular in the UK, but it seems I was obviously way off there.
AdvertBreak wrote:A) Swing music popular again in 1998? Interesting observation but I can't think what music you mean. Certainly not a 'scene' or movement or anything.
To further elaborate, it faltered as it quickly emerged and I guess it only evolved here in the States. Here's an excellent source of info in regards to that brief movement: http://www.stereogum.com/1851924/lets-a ... weird-90s/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
AdvertBreak wrote:B) Your second point there is something that happened LOOONG before the millennium. Prominent manufactured music is not the product of this century and obviously you know that too, so to me your point doesn't hold up. In neither the UK or US was this even a re-emergence but a continuation of before. At the turn of the millennium I know boy bands were in vogue in the states for the first time in almost a decade but take a look at the biggest-selling artists in 1990s America... In the UK I doubt you could have moved for the fuckers even during the heights of Britpop (Boyzone, Take That, etc.) Soulless pop acts always dominant or co-exist with others in the charts.
Grunge and some of the Metal Bands were our biggest selling bands for the most part throughout the 90s, then Post-Grunge and Nu-Metal emerged onto the scene afterwards. What I'm essentially getting at now most of the current touring newer artists are manufactured and came from either Disney or American Idol, or shows of that nature.
AdvertBreak wrote:There's loads of innovation thanks to ever changing production (electronic music really shines in this context, like Flying Lotus or James Blake, or experimental hip hop like Death Grpis etc.) And lots of emerging styles, as just this decade alone we've had underground movements in vaporwave, modern blackgaze, etc., even if they are indebted to past music (just like Britpop and grunge were).
Mainstream music, here in the UK at least, has completely drowned out 'alternative' music, not that it needs it though. I like your comment about a something bound to change soon, if you are referring to the mainstream. But the underground is just as restless as it always has been.
Unfortunately most of those artists don't get properly promoted here because they don't suit a particular format. The States have had issues for years on having to abide by formats and unfortunately several bands didn't generate any recognition here because they didn't suit that label. It seems the UK thinks more outside the box at this time.

AdvertBreak wrote:Yeah I'm 18. My dad often jokes I'd liked to have grown up with "his music", but of course the reality is that I did grow up with "his music", and better yet, in such a way that I now have access to practically all music in the world. I indeed often listen to the music of the past and I do indeed think the musical pop culture (as opposed to underground music) of this decade that the public latch to is pretty faceless. Time will tell how well it holds up.

I better sober up.

Yeah, I turned 18 in Dec of 94 during the time in which the Grunge scene was starting to wane some, but I was again heavily immersed in the 60s. And therefore again I realize how much I took the era I lived in much for granted in spite that I enjoyed what was happening at time. Perhaps though I wished I embraced even more than I did.

I just think we may have some varying perspective because I don't know what truly from the States impacted you at times and most of what you've mentioned unfortunately hasn't burst onto our scene either and I'm always open to discover something newer and refreshing, so your input is greatly appreciated and I wasn't offended by anything you said whatsoever..you weren't rude at all!
Image

User avatar
Mallard No. 22
Posts: 2433
Joined: 01 Oct 2014, 07:46
Location: North East UK

Re: Random music posts

Post by Mallard No. 22 » 06 Jul 2016, 06:57

You have studied the nuances of musical genres more than I have, AB.

These genres (& sub-genres) exist, but most of the listenership does not define them so precisely.

A lot of things I write on the forum are based on personal memories and experience. I look at things from a social history point of view.

Specifically regarding music through the 1990s, through the ears of the everyday listener:

At times, mainstream radio & TV seemed prejudiced against certain types of artist. This meant that e.g. Radio 1 was liable not to play the Manics or the Mondays on prime time shows.

This discrepancy was addressed in the middle of the decade. There was a kind of buzz that seemed to make all genres of music equal. The local college band seemed to have a chance alongside grunge, dance and teen bands. They could all be played after the 1030am news.

Towards the end of the decade it was decided that Robbie Williams or Madonna could do what 'Sleeperblokes' could do. Lower profile artists, who could punch their weight into the top ten, were dispensed with.
"Everybody's Doing It...So Do It Too...."

User avatar
AdvertBreak
Posts: 5571
Joined: 24 Jan 2015, 17:34
Location: Gorgeous Wiltshire

Re: Random music posts

Post by AdvertBreak » 20 Jul 2016, 01:33

Sorry for the belated responses on here and every other thread but here I am.
KingLouieLouie76 wrote:
AdvertBreak wrote:I'm a bit drunk but whatever.
I don't want to be rude, but I disagree with a lot here.

My first point addresses music here in the UK.
1998? Anything huge happening in the UK music...No shit! Garage. UK garage, 2-step garage. Second wave jungle/dnb. And, as should be needless to say, these weren't "fads" or whatever, these were thriving, devoted scenes. Scenes that were split between different personalities, even. Different ages. Different styles. Innovations? Loads. Just listen to a song like Bound 4 Da Reload or Gunman and hear dubstep wobbles, "crime grime" sound effect/speech samples, etc. Long before they became well known in public ears. Independent UK pop music today has so much of its roots in this era. The many rappers and whatever. Grime came about because garage, etc. And this can easily be an unbelievably huge talk about garage. It really can. I mean heck, even close precedents like jungle were the mid-90s more so than Britpop, if we are really speaking about relevancy in UK pop music.
Well, as you know I live in the States and unfortunately that "Garage" scene did not go across the pond sorta speak. I would actually appreciate if you pointed me in the proper direction of what other bands to check out (besides the ones you mentioned). I used to listen to some UK radio later last decade and was blown away how much better the quality of music on your airwaves was. But my point is right on how it hasn't been globally centric for the past couple of decades. Those UK bands aren't emerging here like they once did and we're being deprived.
Yeah I was making a general comment about UK music in particular. As I said it was addressing UK music in particular, although I am 100% sure there were equivalent movements in the States that had a lasting influence and similar legacy. I don't think the charts have been globally centric for not just the past couple of decades but since the 60s. 70s onwards and the UK and US charts could often run as polar inverses just as they could run parallel. There's quite a lot of garage music I could recommend so I might make a separate thread.
KingLouieLouie1976 wrote:
AdvertBreak wrote:And that's just one aspect of it. Both of you are not focusing on music in general, or even acclaimed music, but on chart music (uh?)

Well i've already explained how underground, innovative and communal music (whether it creeps into the mainstream, and it often has, or not, like it often doesn't) has always thrived with just one example in with Britain's garage and its successors. In America there were too movements in this era that were essential building blocks to American pop music. But you refer to 'global appreciation' in the 60s and 90s, and I really have no idea what you're getting at there. In the 60s I can kinda see what you mean, where the biggest bands in one country were the biggest bands in every country. By the 90s that was long since dead. You're going to have to explain what that means, because it makes no sense right now to me.
Several bands from the States back down only mere cult followings still managed to make an impact abroad (including the UK) and conversely Britpop and other UK artists achieved that success here, but that seems to be lacking nowadays due to the lack of exposure or not having the means or vehicle necessary to be marketed effectively. I think our main issue between us two that we're both conflicted on what might have made even a slight dent in our respective music scenes. I even thought the Swing Revival was popular in the UK, but it seems I was obviously way off there.
Thinking of music from 1998 there was quite a few swing-esque records that were hits. Touch and Go's Would You...? is the first that comes to mind. But I suppose its like how, in alternative UK culture, there was an easy listening revival in 1996 and that was very much born out of both Cool Britannia and the 'cult' revival (Pulp Fiction etc) in equal measure. I doubt it ever managed to get anywhere else.
KingLouieLouie1976 wrote:
AdvertBreak wrote:B) Your second point there is something that happened LOOONG before the millennium. Prominent manufactured music is not the product of this century and obviously you know that too, so to me your point doesn't hold up. In neither the UK or US was this even a re-emergence but a continuation of before. At the turn of the millennium I know boy bands were in vogue in the states for the first time in almost a decade but take a look at the biggest-selling artists in 1990s America... In the UK I doubt you could have moved for the fuckers even during the heights of Britpop (Boyzone, Take That, etc.) Soulless pop acts always dominant or co-exist with others in the charts.
Grunge and some of the Metal Bands were our biggest selling bands for the most part throughout the 90s, then Post-Grunge and Nu-Metal emerged onto the scene afterwards. What I'm essentially getting at now most of the current touring newer artists are manufactured and came from either Disney or American Idol, or shows of that nature.
I'm not sure man. There were a lot of non-grunge "alternative" bands that were huge in the US in the 90s such as Hootie and the Blowfish or the Dave Matthews Band. But more to the point there was loads of manufactured music. Whenever I picture the late 90s I picture huge boybands running in parallel to nu metal, such as 'NSync or Backstreet Boys. I don't know the modern US charts well enough to comment but I recon hip hop still has a huge hand.
KingLouieLouie1976 wrote:
AdvertBreak wrote:There's loads of innovation thanks to ever changing production (electronic music really shines in this context, like Flying Lotus or James Blake, or experimental hip hop like Death Grpis etc.) And lots of emerging styles, as just this decade alone we've had underground movements in vaporwave, modern blackgaze, etc., even if they are indebted to past music (just like Britpop and grunge were).
Mainstream music, here in the UK at least, has completely drowned out 'alternative' music, not that it needs it though. I like your comment about a something bound to change soon, if you are referring to the mainstream. But the underground is just as restless as it always has been.
Unfortunately most of those artists don't get properly promoted here because they don't suit a particular format. The States have had issues for years on having to abide by formats and unfortunately several bands didn't generate any recognition here because they didn't suit that label. It seems the UK thinks more outside the box at this time.
Yeah but I was talking about music that isn't on the radio, which is what I meant by underground. These bands get just as promoted in America as in the UK or anywhere, as websites exist beyond just one country.. The likes of Pitchfork and music forums like /mu/ keep these well alive.
KingLouieLouie1976 wrote:I just think we may have some varying perspective because I don't know what truly from the States impacted you at times and most of what you've mentioned unfortunately hasn't burst onto our scene either and I'm always open to discover something newer and refreshing, so your input is greatly appreciated and I wasn't offended by anything you said whatsoever..you weren't rude at all!
I was trying to speak broadly and in commenting on UK and US chart differences where they exist, but yes good points.
Mallard No. 22 wrote:You have studied the nuances of musical genres more than I have, AB.

These genres (& sub-genres) exist, but most of the listenership does not define them so precisely.
I'm confused what you mean. Garage music is very definitely garage
Mallard No. 22 wrote:A lot of things I write on the forum are based on personal memories and experience. I look at things from a social history point of view.

Specifically regarding music through the 1990s, through the ears of the everyday listener:

At times, mainstream radio & TV seemed prejudiced against certain types of artist. This meant that e.g. Radio 1 was liable not to play the Manics or the Mondays on prime time shows.
I try and do the same where I can, like with my memories of the mid-2000s.

Radio is still like this now of course..the mainstream is always the mainstream and so their attitudes stay the same no matter how differently dressed.

User avatar
KingLouieLouie76
Posts: 3219
Joined: 10 Sep 2014, 03:51
Location: Phoenix, AZ (USA)
Contact:

Re: Random music posts

Post by KingLouieLouie76 » 21 Jul 2016, 02:47

I agree with you, AdvertBreak regarding all the points you covered in your last response.....What I find intriguing is Britpop vs. Grunge..... I recall there was quite a rivalry between both movements at the time... so interesting to reflect back on it now.... I googled that and the results were quite fascinating!
Image

User avatar
Mallard No. 22
Posts: 2433
Joined: 01 Oct 2014, 07:46
Location: North East UK

Re: Random music posts

Post by Mallard No. 22 » 21 Jul 2016, 06:48

AdvertBreak wrote:Sorry for the belated responses on here and every other thread but here I am.

Thinking of music from 1998 there was quite a few swing-esque records that were hits. Touch and Go's Would You...? is the first that comes to mind. But I suppose its like how, in alternative UK culture, there was an easy listening revival in 1996 and that was very much born out of both Cool Britannia and the 'cult' revival (Pulp Fiction etc) in equal measure. I doubt it ever managed to get anywhere else.
Yes I agree, the easy listening revival began about this time and was influenced by the reasons you say.
"Everybody's Doing It...So Do It Too...."

User avatar
Mallard No. 22
Posts: 2433
Joined: 01 Oct 2014, 07:46
Location: North East UK

Re: Random music posts

Post by Mallard No. 22 » 21 Jul 2016, 06:58

AdvertBreak wrote:
Mallard No. 22 wrote:You have studied the nuances of musical genres more than I have, AB.

These genres (& sub-genres) exist, but most of the listenership does not define them so precisely.
I'm confused what you mean. Garage music is very definitely garage
What I mean is, the casual listener will like and buy records, and remember them years later. But they are less clued up about what genre they are from, what the trends/nuances of the music scene are etc.
AdvertBreak wrote:
Mallard No. 22 wrote:A lot of things I write on the forum are based on personal memories and experience. I look at things from a social history point of view.

Specifically regarding music through the 1990s, through the ears of the everyday listener:

At times, mainstream radio & TV seemed prejudiced against certain types of artist. This meant that e.g. Radio 1 was liable not to play the Manics or the Mondays on prime time shows.
I try and do the same where I can, like with my memories of the mid-2000s.

Radio is still like this now of course..the mainstream is always the mainstream and so their attitudes stay the same no matter how differently dressed.
Yes absolutely. Whilst this has generally been the case over many years, Radio 1 did play indie music on much more equal terms to other genres during the mid-late 90s.

I can't comment on Radio 1 now as I haven't listened for a decade or more, and it is aimed at a generation younger than me. Though I know how awful Radio 2 is and I am in the age group for its listenership. Obvious records and patronising 'we know best' patois from the presenters & guests.
"Everybody's Doing It...So Do It Too...."

User avatar
AdvertBreak
Posts: 5571
Joined: 24 Jan 2015, 17:34
Location: Gorgeous Wiltshire

Re: Random music posts

Post by AdvertBreak » 02 Sep 2016, 02:10

Yeah Radio 2 drive me nuts. I mean they don't cry out REAL music like Absolute do but there's a definite "we got this" vibe I get off them and their listeners.

I came here to say that If I was stranded on a desert island and I could pick a 700,000 box set of every blues song ever, or all 7 minutes of Blue Monday, then I'd be more than comfortable for the rest of my life in the arms of the latter blue.

User avatar
Mallard No. 22
Posts: 2433
Joined: 01 Oct 2014, 07:46
Location: North East UK

Re: Random music posts

Post by Mallard No. 22 » 03 Sep 2016, 05:45

AdvertBreak wrote: Yeah Radio 2 drive me nuts....there's a definite "we got this" vibe I get off them and their listeners.
....the sun always shines on that station. They should be on a desert island.... ;)

AdvertBreak wrote: I came here to say that If I was stranded on a desert island and I could pick a 700,000 box set of every blues song ever, or all 7 minutes of Blue Monday, then I'd be more than comfortable for the rest of my life in the arms of the latter blue.
....careful, they've done 700,000 re-mixes of that.... :lol:
"Everybody's Doing It...So Do It Too...."

User avatar
AdvertBreak
Posts: 5571
Joined: 24 Jan 2015, 17:34
Location: Gorgeous Wiltshire

Re: Random music posts

Post by AdvertBreak » 24 Dec 2017, 01:56

Rook is the greatest song that Andy Partridge has ever written

Its arguably preferable to anything Damon has ever done but obviously its EXTREMELY close

User avatar
KingLouieLouie76
Posts: 3219
Joined: 10 Sep 2014, 03:51
Location: Phoenix, AZ (USA)
Contact:

Re: Random music posts

Post by KingLouieLouie76 » 28 Dec 2017, 05:47

2007 was the last great full year of music! Or am I truly missing out?
Image

User avatar
Forever Low Man
Posts: 2254
Joined: 12 Sep 2014, 16:47
Location: A million miles away, in your backyard
Contact:

Re: Random music posts

Post by Forever Low Man » 28 Dec 2017, 20:18

KingLouieLouie76 wrote:2007 was the last great full year of music! Or am I truly missing out?
yeah you're missing out

probably
Image
damon008 wrote:you kill intermission like i eat hot dinners

Post Reply