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AdvertBreak
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Re: Random Posts

Post by AdvertBreak » 27 Jan 2016, 02:21

Old skool AdBreak

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Re: Random Posts

Post by AdvertBreak » 02 Feb 2016, 09:33

Album 1 - Delivers us their basic sound
Album 2 - Builds on it
Album 3 - They built on it even more and change many components, creating their critical masterpiece
Album 4 - The band take a complete curveball and release something completely different, creating their other critical masterpiece

OMD, Talk Talk, The Who, Radiohead
The mid two bands arguably released their most acclaimed with their fifth albums.

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Re: Random Posts

Post by AdvertBreak » 03 Feb 2016, 02:46

Can anyone think of others?

Meanwhile, here's one I've been meaning to do for a while.

Albums that had mixed or negative reception at first and are now regarded as masterpieces. Some to begin with

The Beach Boys - Pet Sounds
Van Morrison - Astral Weeks
The Beatles - The White Album
The Beatles - Abbey Road
Paul & Linda McCartney - Ram
Genesis - Selling England by the Pound
David Bowie - Low
OMD - Dazzle Ships
Talk Talk - Spirit of Eden
Oasis - Morning Glory
Weezer - Pinkerton

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Mallard No. 22
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Re: Random Posts

Post by Mallard No. 22 » 06 Feb 2016, 09:54

:o I don't think Abbey Road had a mixed or negative reception did it? I can understand that the White Album did.

My experience was that '(What's The Story) Morning Glory' was acclaimed from the start. I don't remember any negativity around it.

'Be Here Now' was a mixed reception, though listening to it now it doesn't seem quite the let-down that it was at the time.
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101reykjavik
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Re: Random Posts

Post by 101reykjavik » 06 Feb 2016, 10:01

Yes, I thought Abbey Road was received well.

You're right about Be Here Now. It is all over the place and then fairly quickly revisionism set in for those who were out of step. I think it was Paul Du Noyer who gave it five stars in Q originally. Getting a bit carried away clearly...
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Re: Random Posts

Post by Mallard No. 22 » 06 Feb 2016, 10:04

Paul Gambaccini was the first prominent person I remember saying (on a TV show not long after its release) that 'Be Here Now' was a disappointment.

At the time, such was the Oasis frenzy, it was hard to accept that it could be a poorer album, but I think that by the end of the year we had to reluctantly accept that it was.
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Re: Random Posts

Post by AdvertBreak » 06 Feb 2016, 13:00

What's the Story had a mixed reception from British critics at the time, but was soon considered a masterpiece, not at least because the pubilc fell in love with it.

Be Here Now was the opposite. Glowing, unanimously positive reviews at first (seem to remember The Last Party saying it was a Sgt Pepper-esque moment of praise), but soon enough was reconsidered to be a disappointment. I can't really think of any other examples of an album like that. Not even Tommy comes close because most still love that album.

But yeah, it had 5/5s and 10/10s across the board to begin with, unlike Morning Glory's mixed reviews (even from the likes of Q and Melody Maker, but those mags would later probably have been among the first to give them 5/5s and 10/10s)

IIRC, Abbey Road had mixed reviews, some criticizing the Moog and 'studio' sound, some the medley and so forth. People soon realised that they were idiots. 8-)

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Re: Random Posts

Post by AdvertBreak » 08 Feb 2016, 14:35

An alternative BEST ALBUMS OF 1996 list

Sometime not to long ago, I posted a list of my favourite albums from 1996. I disagree with a bit of that list now, but everyone did at the time.

Anyway, I want to do an 'alternative' list of 96's best LPs. Basically, this means it will include albums not featured on the 'Best albums of 1996' list on Acclaimed Music, which is an aggregated list made via critics' list. This includes the "bubbling under the all time top 3000" at the bottom. http://www.acclaimedmusic.net/Current/1996a.htm" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Top 5 folk or Celtic genius albums
1. Show of Hands - Live at the Royal Albert Hall
2. Peatbog Faeries - Mellowosity
3. Edward II - Zest
4. Shooglenifty - A Whisky Kiss
5. Wolfstone - The Half Tail

and the worst: Wolfstone - Wolfstone II (if it counts, it's not band-endorsed anyway)

Top 5 DJ mix albums
1. Sasha and John Digweed - Northern Exposure
2. Pete Tong and Boy George - The Annual II
3. (Various) - Cream Live Two
4. Frankie Knuckles - Sessions Six
5. LTJ Bukem ‎– Logical Progression

and the worst: Mix'o'Matic (I'm writing a review)

Top 5 compilations
1. Ocean of Sound
2. This is...Easy
3. The Sound Gallery Volume One
4. Inflight Entertaniment
5. The Beautiful Game

and the worst: The Greatest Dance Album Under The Sun!

Top 5 albums that don't fit in
1. Cardiacs - Sing to God
2. The Brian Jonestown Massacre - Take it from the Man!
3. Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan and Michael Brook - Night Song
4. David Toop - Pink Noir
5. Tony! Toni! Tone - House of Music

and the worst: Neu! - Neu! '72 Live in Düsseldorf

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Re: Random Posts

Post by Mallard No. 22 » 12 Feb 2016, 08:49

AdvertBreak wrote:What's the Story had a mixed reception from British critics at the time, but was soon considered a masterpiece, not least because the public fell in love with it.
:o Don't remember that. I mainly remember positivity around it, e.g. from Radio 1, NME. I agree that its success was enhanced because this was when indie music really crossed over to the public.
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Re: Random Posts

Post by 101reykjavik » 13 Feb 2016, 09:51

Talking of 90s stuff, I was watching one of those trashy lists of things / talking heads programmes on Channel 5 last night: 'Bad TV of the 90s' or something. And my friend and I were both saying that although we both regard the 90s as relatively recent history, based on some of those clips it feels like we're now in a whole different world of attitudes. Which came as a shock as one doesn't like to think of one's youth as being from a faraway land. Some examples:

• Professional contrarian Richard Littlejohn hosting a show with, amongst others, some gay / lesbian guests to talk about: surrogacy; same sex couples as parents etc; with him insulting, berating and offending his guests in the most appalling manner. Other guests took him to task, but it just wouldn't happen now. And he'd be probably hounded to the ends of the Earth. Not back again next week with another episode which I'm sure he was at the time.

• Live TV. Topless darts, on a supposedly 'mainstream', though clearly hugely low-rent channel. Can you imagine the outrage from Twitter social justice warriors at such an affront to feminism now?

• Various late-night / after pub entertainment shows on Channel 4 - Girlie Show / Something for the Weekend with Denise Van Outen etc - the latter involving the game 'Artful Todger' whereby a female guest has to guess which male member matches which name on the board.

I can't imagine it getting a look in on TV these days. But would any of that happen now??
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Re: Random Posts

Post by AdvertBreak » 13 Feb 2016, 16:37

Mallard, the likes of Q and Melody Maker weren't so into it. The reappraisal was quick, when Q named it best album of 1996. Noel's acceptance speech took the piss out of Q's original review. "I accept this on behalf of a shit album with shit songs," I think it was.

Very interesting stuff 101 reykjavik
101reykjavik wrote:Talking of 90s stuff, I was watching one of those trashy lists of things / talking heads programmes on Channel 5 last night: 'Bad TV of the 90s' or something. And my friend and I were both saying that although we both regard the 90s as relatively recent history, based on some of those clips it feels like we're now in a whole different world of attitudes. Which came as a shock as one doesn't like to think of one's youth as being from a faraway land. Some examples:

• Professional contrarian Richard Littlejohn hosting a show with, amongst others, some gay / lesbian guests to talk about: surrogacy; same sex couples as parents etc; with him insulting, berating and offending his guests in the most appalling manner. Other guests took him to task, but it just wouldn't happen now. And he'd be probably hounded to the ends of the Earth. Not back again next week with another episode which I'm sure he was at the time.
Not familiar with that show, but it sounds like one of the rougher episodes of After Dark, which of course was groundbreaking stuff but was eventually axed. I can't think of anything like that on TV now, especially not one that could get so deep with one subject and not suffer for it, especially as attitudes towards many things are generally much better today. The times weren't completely resistant to shows getting touchy, obviously, as on a completely different subject matter think about This Week's Death on the Rock episode. It didn't just cost the show its existence but Thames Television too.
101reykjavik wrote:• Live TV. Topless darts, on a supposedly 'mainstream', though clearly hugely low-rent channel. Can you imagine the outrage from Twitter social justice warriors at such an affront to feminism now?
Didn't know about that either, but I'm very surprised that was allowed to happen in the 90s, not at least because it sounds like an attempt to make proper erotica (what with it being a low-rent channel lol), whereas a 'mainstream' novelty like 2000's nudists-and-Keith Chegwin Naked Jungle is still publicly shamed today.
101reykjavik wrote:• Various late-night / after pub entertainment shows on Channel 4 - Girlie Show / Something for the Weekend with Denise Van Outen etc - the latter involving the game 'Artful Todger' whereby a female guest has to guess which male member matches which name on the board.

I can't imagine it getting a look in on TV these days. But would any of that happen now??
I also saw The Girly Show on a BBC Two "I Love 1996" thing (which also covered This Life, kinda cutting edge before Cold Feet). And if we're speaking post-pub Channel 4 stuff then I guess The Word also falls into that category. I guess both The Girly Show and The Word were pretty, err, "edgy", lots of potential controversy. The Word obviously did cause a bit of uproar, in the form of a certain body part at least, but the comments that guests said, err, I dunno (Shabba Ranks' comment about gays didn't even cost him his career, his biggest hit was just around the corner.) Didn't The Girly Show have "twat of the week" or something? I've never read of any of the "twats" responding to it. Not sure it would be the same story if we had that today, partly because its easier to hear about such things and reply to them. By having Facebook and Twitter it makes it easier for people to hear stuff and voice their opinion of something on a much grander scale. The talk of the pub is no longer the limit.

But anyway, heck, I may be 18 but I'm forever feeling very strong 2000s nostalgia, especially early in the decade. Its literally my life. And times do change in a short time. Just today I was going through ome of my old CDs and one, New Pepsi Chart! 2002, has a giant Asda Smart Price £14.99 sticker on it haha! I remember getting that CD too in early 2002. It would sell for like £9.99 today. Oh and I have a lot of nostalgic TV from times like that. When I was a bit younger I even started a campaign via my 'BringItBackITV' channel to bring back ITV's 1999-2006 logo! And that's for many reasons but its all nostalgia. This'll be a bit of a random comment really but old studio-based shows from, say, 2003, looked so different than today's! I'm speaking the likes of game shows, live TV shows such as award shoes, clip shows like You've Been Framed (when it was based in a studio) and Tarrant on TV. For one, lots of colour! And it was the same in the 90s of course. Everything today seems so black with giant LED walls, too many digital screens or whatever. I remember flicking over to Eurovision a year or two ago and the podium that the host stood at reminded me a lot of the way it used to be done here! When the Brit Awards moved from Earls Court to the O2 they changed their design completely and it looks rubbish to me now. It's an odd and splashy observation, but there.

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Re: Random Posts

Post by Mallard No. 22 » 16 Feb 2016, 08:29

Interesting discussion on what is, and what is not, acceptable on TV.

I haven't studied it, but my memory is that a wave of 'political correctness' began to sweep through life in the later 80s. This was when racist/sexist comments/jokes began to be purged from mainstream media.

I think that TV of the 90s like The James Whale Radio Show, The Word, TFI Friday, The Girlie Show was a reaction to this, and allowed risque material to be shown on certain channels after what became known as the '9pm watershed'. Just as indie & rave were a reaction to the staid music of the late 80s, a time when life became increasingly sterile.

TFI Friday had features like 'Ugly Bloke' and 'Fat Lookalikes', which didn't re-appear in the new 2015 series and weren't mentioned. I suspect though that many of the participants in the 90s were actors anyway, so were in fact 'playing a role' rather than depicting themselves.
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Re: Random Posts

Post by AdvertBreak » 19 Feb 2016, 15:20

Also in the world of 90s TV, Jarvis Cocker vs Michael Jackson at the Brits was 20 years ago today! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wJluMi8bXYo" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

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Re: Random Posts

Post by 101reykjavik » 19 Feb 2016, 21:10

I remember it well. It was an exciting event at the time to this then 19 year old. Go Jarvis!!! Him getting interviewed by the police (crazy stuff), Bob Mortimer acting as impromptu solicitor and all that, the Brits was still edgy then and properly unplanned stuff could happen.
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Re: Random Posts

Post by Mallard No. 22 » 22 Feb 2016, 09:36

I was at the Pulp gig at Newcastle Arena a few days later. Jarvis acknowledged the audience for cheering him.

"Thanks. It's been a difficult week" he said. I suspect it was, and no doubt he was spoken to sternly by Jackson's people. They would be big enough to buy up Pulp's contract, so the whole episode probably turned out very scary for Jarvis.

Great for music fans though, and more subversive than anything the Gallaghers would have dared do.... 8-)
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