Hidden references to Damon in Brett Anderson's Coal Black Mornings

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John_d
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Hidden references to Damon in Brett Anderson's Coal Black Mornings

Post by John_d » 25 Sep 2019, 08:27

I’m a fan of Suede, and Brett’s autobiography got great reviews so I got round to reading it. He describes Justine Frischmann as one of the two great loves of his life, and mentions how she stayed in Suede for 6 months after they broke up. Damon is never mentioned as the cause of the break up (Damon or Blur are never mentioned at all) but I spotted some references which I thought it would be fun to mention, as it would take a trained Blur anorak to pick up on most of them. The implication is that Brett and Justine enjoyed certain things which were then later copied by Damon:

• Graffiti at Marble Arch saying MODERN LIFE IS RUBBISH
• “Popscene” music annuals from the 1970s
• London Fields, which Brett was “obsessed” by
• There’s a pointed quote of the “get some heavy metal” lyric from “see that animal” (I have always found the heavy metal line in Song 2 intriguing, I never knew this Elastica song was a Suede cover)
• The London novels of Patrick Hamilton (acknowledged by Damon as an influence on Essex Dogs)

There’s probably more that I didn’t spot…

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lumaka
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Location: Warsaw, Poland

Re: Hidden references to Damon in Brett Anderson's Coal Black Mornings

Post by lumaka » 25 Sep 2019, 08:52

Funnily enough, I've read a review of the new Brett's book in Mojo today - and again, it seems that he doesn't mention Damon at all.

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lumaka
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Location: Warsaw, Poland

Re: Hidden references to Damon in Brett Anderson's Coal Black Mornings

Post by lumaka » 25 Sep 2019, 19:25

more on Damon, Blur, Britpop and 'Afternoons with the Blinds Drawn':

Brett Anderson: ‘I was never a great musician. My talent is that I never give up’

(…) However, Blur and Oasis came to dominate the movement. And although Anderson writes with self-recrimination about his career mistakes and amused hauteur when a Scottish spectator dismisses Suede as “effete Southern wankers”, he completely loses his composure when writing about Blur. He rails against “witless, opportunist mockneys — middle class ‘media geezers’ who had learned to drop their aitches and flatten their vowels . . . a cheap, beery, graceless cartoon bereft of passion or rage who cravenly hid feeling behind a brittle mask of irony”.

Hearing this invective read back to him, he gives a tight little cough. “I wanted to make the point that our debut album [Suede] was the first Britpop album and it set the tone. I was writing as a poor suburban wannabe, alienated and marginalised by the city. Suede’s music wasn’t celebration, it was documentation. It wasn’t ‘Carry on Cockney’, it was a Mike Leigh film. Then these other bands turned Britpop into a patronising celebration with ugly hints of nationalism and misogyny. By that I mean Loaded [the men’s magazine] and Men Behaving Badly [the sitcom] were in the ascendant and these bands got into bed with that. I am very proud that Suede were already writing about gender fluidity and sexual politics, which still feels very contemporary. I’m amazed these other bands are still taken seriously, they are such an anachronism.”

Many will feel the bile is partly because the co-founder of Suede — and Anderson’s ex-girlfriend — Justine Frischmann left him for the Blur frontman Damon Albarn (she found success with her band, Elastica, and works as an artist in the US). So much of Afternoons with the Blinds Drawn is written in a spirit of generous, forgiving retrospection, it seems incredible that he still cannot mention Albarn or Blur by name. “I choose not to. I don’t want to give it air time. It’s my memoir, not anyone else’s, and I stand by my right.”

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