David Bowie Thread

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What Are Your Top 5 Bowie Albums?

David Bowie
1
1%
Space Oddity
5
4%
The Man Who Sold The World
3
3%
Hunky Dory
11
10%
The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars
10
9%
Aladdin Sane
7
6%
Pin Ups
0
No votes
Diamond Dogs
5
4%
Young Americans
6
5%
Station To Station
11
10%
Low
13
11%
"Heroes"
11
10%
Lodger
5
4%
Scary Monsters (And Super Creeps)
2
2%
Let's Dance
6
5%
Tonight
0
No votes
Never Let Me Down
0
No votes
Tin Machine
0
No votes
Tin Machine II
0
No votes
Black Tie White Noise
1
1%
The Buddha of Suburbia
0
No votes
Outside
1
1%
Earthling
0
No votes
'Hours...'
1
1%
Heathen
0
No votes
Reality
0
No votes
The Next Day
3
3%
Blackstar
13
11%
 
Total votes: 115

mr_spenalzo
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Re: David Bowie Thread (RIP)

Post by mr_spenalzo » 16 Feb 2016, 20:20

I rank them mehh

But I think I've only heard 2 Bowie covers that I like: "As The World Falls Down" by Lights and "Andy Warhol" by Dana Gillespie

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Re: David Bowie Thread (RIP)

Post by KingLouieLouie76 » 17 Feb 2016, 06:39

mr_spenalzo wrote:I rank them mehh

But I think I've only heard 2 Bowie covers that I like: "As The World Falls Down" by Lights and "Andy Warhol" by Dana Gillespie

Yeah... Bowie is awfully complex to try to replicate his sound in any manner whatsoever....

I don't believe we've discussed this, but how did everyone feel about Tin Machine? It was certainly the best possible direction he could have went into at that time!
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Re: David Bowie Thread (RIP)

Post by Mallard No. 22 » 22 Feb 2016, 07:43

I am afraid that Tin Machine passed me by at the time :|

Artists as diverse as Peter Noone, Mott The Hoople and Lulu covered Bowie's songs in the 70s and had big hits.

The made decent versions, sometimes standing comparison with the original. But it is notable that the man himself could be involved in the recording, as was the case with Lulu.
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Re: David Bowie Thread (RIP)

Post by AdvertBreak » 24 Feb 2016, 17:42

Black Tie White Noise might just be my third favourite Bowie album actually, after Low and Blackstar. I'm not joking. It's just sooo good.

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Re: David Bowie Thread (RIP)

Post by KingLouieLouie76 » 24 Feb 2016, 18:39

AdvertBreak wrote:Black Tie White Noise might just be my third favourite Bowie album actually, after Low and Blackstar. I'm not joking. It's just sooo good.

I rank it up there among my faves as well. Having Ronson back at guitar was very significant and he was able to go through another solid transition as well.

Going back to Tin Machine, that enabled him to remain relevant when the music industry was at an extreme crossroads without him compromising himself in the process. Again, his keen ability to adapt always kept him afloat...not only that.. but ahead of the pack!
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Re: David Bowie Thread (RIP)

Post by AdvertBreak » 24 Feb 2016, 18:52

Black Tie isn't a guitar record but Mark Ronson's cameo is great. It's an odd sound really, soul-influenced house music, with sax and ..ur...I dunno, it's a unique sound, and he doesn't get enough credit for it. Especially tracks like Pallas Athena - dark and scary house music?

P.S. Jay thinks the album is "cheesy" because its "dated". It's neither, obviously. Being dated doesn't make something cheesy, and it's no more dated than every other Bowie album that sounds a bit ahead of its time from Low to Ziggy.

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Re: David Bowie Thread (RIP)

Post by KingLouieLouie76 » 24 Feb 2016, 19:01

AdvertBreak wrote:Black Tie isn't a guitar record but Mark Ronson's cameo is great. It's an odd sound really, soul-influenced house music, with sax and ..ur...I dunno, it's a unique sound, and he doesn't get enough credit for it. Especially tracks like Pallas Athena - dark and scary house music?

P.S. Jay thinks the album is "cheesy" because its "dated". It's neither, obviously. Being dated doesn't make something cheesy, and it's no more dated than every other Bowie album that sounds a bit ahead of its time from Low to Ziggy.

Nile Rodgers was why essentially it wasn't a guitar record, but at least it wasn't another "Let's Dance", so definitely give him credit there. But that again was the time for him to be more experimental. I don't consider "Black Tie" to be dated whatsoever... The only time to me Bowie sounded dated would be "Let's Dance" and "Tonight" (because he was trying to replicate "Let's Dance" success). Although, unfortunately he needed to resort to that more commercial sound at the time to reach out and attract a newer/younger audience who was into that sound at the time and he contrary to to several others was able to recover from that extreme miscalculation.
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Re: David Bowie Thread (RIP)

Post by AdvertBreak » 24 Feb 2016, 19:21

KingLouieLouie76 wrote:
AdvertBreak wrote:Black Tie isn't a guitar record but Mark Ronson's cameo is great. It's an odd sound really, soul-influenced house music, with sax and ..ur...I dunno, it's a unique sound, and he doesn't get enough credit for it. Especially tracks like Pallas Athena - dark and scary house music?

P.S. Jay thinks the album is "cheesy" because its "dated". It's neither, obviously. Being dated doesn't make something cheesy, and it's no more dated than every other Bowie album that sounds a bit ahead of its time from Low to Ziggy.
Nile Rodgers was why essentially it wasn't a guitar record, but at least it wasn't another "Let's Dance", so definitely give him credit there. But that again was the time for him to be more experimental. I don't consider "Black Tie" to be dated whatsoever... The only time to me Bowie sounded dated would be "Let's Dance" and "Tonight" (because he was trying to replicate "Let's Dance" success). Although, unfortunately he needed to resort to that more commercial sound at the time to reach out and attract a newer/younger audience who was into that sound at the time and he contrary to to several others was able to recover from that extreme miscalculation.
Yeah Bowie was looking to create what he called "a melodic form of house" with Nile. It was the beginning of Bowie's second electronic phase (1992-98) and its entirely self-contained, nothing like the two even-more-so-overlooked records that surround it (Tin Machine II and The Buddha of Suburbia). I agree that Let's Dance and Tonight are dated, and so is Never Let Me Down. "Dated" more or less means "suffering for being from its time" in my opinion, and that applies to basically no music made in the 90s, but a fair bit in the 80s, those albums included. Let's Dance is still pretty damn good nonetheless, but I think Bowie and Nile were going for different things there. Bowie was looking to mix blues guitarwork with a modern dance beat, and maybe in his mind Nile was the guy for that, but it ended up sounding pretty ubiquitous. Fortunately Black Tie was a success in sounding unique and still fresh today.

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Re: David Bowie Thread (RIP)

Post by davidsutter » 24 Feb 2016, 19:25

I like Let's Dance.

Yeah, it sounds like 80's pop but I happen to like some good 80's pop. And it's good.
Tonight is weaker and I've heard Never Let Me Down is the worst he's ever had so I haven't given it a try yet..

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Re: David Bowie Thread (RIP)

Post by KingLouieLouie76 » 24 Feb 2016, 20:06

To put everything back into perspective... we're talking about 1983-1987 when it was mainly the "MTV Generation" dictating everything...It was style over substance and several artists like Bowie compromised themselves so they could essentially "fit in" with the masses. Being commercial is against everything that Bowie stood for, but he knew had to resort to that because many of contemporaries didn't survive because they weren't able or willing to "fit in".

I only saw Bowie live once, which was during his 1987 "Glass Spider Tour" which was in support of "Never Let Me Down". Everything was lavish and extravagant...the entire production..the stage design, lighting, etc.... One instance though my dad and I (I was 10 at the time) dismissed was he seemed to randomly call a female up to the stage to join him (we thought it was merely some fan), but she turned-out to be part of his crew. That had an odd vibe to it.....

That entire album and tour was a commercial success, but again it was against everything Bowie stood for, which is why he retreated and then went on with the Tin Machine. I think Bowie and U2 were the best at reinventing themselves during that entire period.

I still love "Let's Dance" because at 6-years old that initially introduced me to him. Then, I began to gradually check-out his entire back catalog and fall further more in awe of this institution... this genius...... Also, hearing "Under Pressure" further got me into him at the time... I liked "Tonight" and was mixed on "Never Let Me Down"... but the Tin Machine really got me back into him immediately! You could tell he was rejuvenated and realized he didn't have to sell himself out further to be loved by everyone....
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Re: David Bowie Thread (RIP)

Post by AdvertBreak » 24 Feb 2016, 21:22

KingLouieLouie76 wrote:To put everything back into perspective... we're talking about 1983-1987 when it was mainly the "MTV Generation" dictating everything...It was style over substance and several artists like Bowie compromised themselves so they could essentially "fit in" with the masses. Being commercial is against everything that Bowie stood for, but he knew had to resort to that because many of contemporaries didn't survive because they weren't able or willing to "fit in".

I only saw Bowie live once, which was during his 1987 "Glass Spider Tour" which was in support of "Never Let Me Down". Everything was lavish and extravagant...the entire production..the stage design, lighting, etc.... One instance though my dad and I (I was 10 at the time) dismissed was he seemed to randomly call a female up to the stage to join him (we thought it was merely some fan), but she turned-out to be part of his crew. That had an odd vibe to it.....

That entire album and tour was a commercial success, but again it was against everything Bowie stood for, which is why he retreated and then went on with the Tin Machine. I think Bowie and U2 were the best at reinventing themselves during that entire period.

I still love "Let's Dance" because at 6-years old that initially introduced me to him. Then, I began to gradually check-out his entire back catalog and fall further more in awe of this institution... this genius...... Also, hearing "Under Pressure" further got me into him at the time... I liked "Tonight" and was mixed on "Never Let Me Down"... but the Tin Machine really got me back into him immediately! You could tell he was rejuvenated and realized he didn't have to sell himself out further to be loved by everyone....
But as I say, Bowie insists that Let's Dance wasn't supposed to be commercial, or "common". His fusion of "dance and blues". Nile of course added his sheen with Bowie, and it becomes, in the end, less ubiquitous that maybe he thought it was. And so yeah, it was huge, he did MTV (whilst at the same time ripping them down face to face about their treatment towards black artists), and got into the spirit. Yeah he was anti-commercial, but that wasn't really his spirit at the time. The guy did an advert for Pepsi! I'm sure there's nothing he would later regret more. Maybe that was to partly fund the Glass Spider Tour.

And yeah, the Glass Spider Tour was Bowie at his nadir but at least he was still trying to be creative visually. The stage was immensive and set the tone for big stadium tours with its giant elaborate spider stage. Not to mention the unusual structure, songs separated by strange little acts and vignettes with the strange actors etc. etc. Shame about the album though (although there are a few good tracks imo). My mum went to see it, only time she's seen him live, and has forever said how it wasn't any good. I still envy anyone who saw Bowie but its a shame that his most attended tour was his worst.

But yeah he wasn't really into it at all. He'd basically been scrubbed out by critics by that point as well. So in comes his curveball with Tin Machine. He would later consider his pop era to be his "Phil Collins years". :lol:

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Re: David Bowie Thread (RIP)

Post by Consigliere_11 » 24 Feb 2016, 22:09

I couldn't stand listening to his 80s records (except for Scary Monsters) while exploring his discography. With each single one of them he was repeating himself and some tracks feel.. So plasticy and soulless.. Especially on NLMD. Although, there was one track on it, which was alright, but I can't get it out of the top of my head right now. Tin Machine was a needed reboot, though I find it a bit boring too. Black Tie White Noise was his return to the form, but I wish he had gone on with the Outside series with Eno. It might have been hell of a concept and out of his 90s records it hooked me up the most.
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Re: David Bowie Thread (RIP)

Post by AdvertBreak » 24 Feb 2016, 22:14

Yeah the Outside series may have been really good. Although that might have sacrificed the awesome Earthling, so maybe he could have done both :lol:

Outside 5 would have been better than Hours though. ;)

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Re: David Bowie Thread (RIP)

Post by Consigliere_11 » 24 Feb 2016, 22:19

I think that in some imaginary scenario Heathen could be named as one of the Outside records. I know it was influenced by 9/11 and is way off this "XXI century coming" theme, but musically and conceptually the albums are close, although Heathen is a "safer" record per se. So, Outside 4 could be better than Hours, I agree ;), while more electronic version of Heathen could have closed the series.
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Re: David Bowie Thread (RIP)

Post by KingLouieLouie76 » 25 Feb 2016, 01:25

AdvertBreak wrote:
But as I say, Bowie insists that Let's Dance wasn't supposed to be commercial, or "common". His fusion of "dance and blues". Nile of course added his sheen with Bowie, and it becomes, in the end, less ubiquitous that maybe he thought it was. And so yeah, it was huge, he did MTV (whilst at the same time ripping them down face to face about their treatment towards black artists), and got into the spirit. Yeah he was anti-commercial, but that wasn't really his spirit at the time. The guy did an advert for Pepsi! I'm sure there's nothing he would later regret more. Maybe that was to partly fund the Glass Spider Tour.

And yeah, the Glass Spider Tour was Bowie at his nadir but at least he was still trying to be creative visually. The stage was immensive and set the tone for big stadium tours with its giant elaborate spider stage. Not to mention the unusual structure, songs separated by strange little acts and vignettes with the strange actors etc. etc. Shame about the album though (although there are a few good tracks imo). My mum went to see it, only time she's seen him live, and has forever said how it wasn't any good. I still envy anyone who saw Bowie but its a shame that his most attended tour was his worst.

But yeah he wasn't really into it at all. He'd basically been scrubbed out by critics by that point as well. So in comes his curveball with Tin Machine. He would later consider his pop era to be his "Phil Collins years". :lol:

I believe we're having a slight conflict on "commercial".... It seemed however Bowie was aiming for a more "accessible" sound which was far in contrast w/the experimental works leading up to "Let's Dance"....Several other artists (including Phil Collins solo and Genesis during that period) weren't as experimental or sophisticated because they wouldn't be able to capture in 3 minutes or less in a video.

Yeah.... I echo your mom's sentiments on "Glass Spider"....But he still put on an incredible set!

The Tin Men was the best thing to happen to him at the time...otherwise...he might have really sunk below depths that he might have never been able to fully overcome...
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