Last Album You Listened To?

Other music and recommendations.

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TripleJay97
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Last Album You Listened To?

Post by TripleJay97 » 22 May 2015, 15:15

Inspired by conversations between me and one of my friends, I thought it would be a nice idea to pop up occasionally and let everyone know the last full album you listened to and your impressions/thoughts on it.

I'll start:

Captain Beefheart & his Magic Band - Safe as Milk
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Undeniably a classic. I love the guitar on this album, it inspired me to pick up my old Jaguar again after I decided a while ago to be a singer. It introduced some really interesting new ideas to the rock music formula and it's still a really enjoyable listen.
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AdvertBreak
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Re: Last Album You Listened To?

Post by AdvertBreak » 22 May 2015, 15:29

The JAMs - 1987 (What the Fuck is Going On?)

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Firstly, The JAMs (Justified Ancients of Mu Mu) was what The KLF called themselves when they started out, and this their first album succeeds "All You Need is Love" as their second release, and by this point they were already notorious. 1987 is full of unauthorised samples, very strong Scottish accent rapping typically political/satirical lyrics, 80s house beats, jabs and the like. "Hey Hey We are Not the Monkees" is utterly bizarre, and then even that's followed by a minute of a Tube train arriving. On side 2 there's Dancing Queen-rip off "The Queen and I", three minutes of various TV shows they recorded (mostly Top of the Pops), there's cringey baby wah wah melodies all over the album but surely the point of this album is that its pretty unlistenable. It's quite funny though!

When the press hailed them leaders of the sampling revolution, they quickly rejected that, and when Abba sued them, they burnt all of the copies in a field and then replaced it with an "edited version" where not only have the samples been removed, but they just leave a silent gap, meaning there was so little music that it was classified as a 12" :P They took it too far at times but when they were serious at making music, they sure did make some good tracks, or when they weren't being fully serious when making music, it ends up being funny.

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KingLouieLouie76
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Re: Last Album You Listened To?

Post by KingLouieLouie76 » 22 May 2015, 21:55

Beach Boys "Friends"

It is vastly underrated.... But just over 25 minutes long....but WELL worth it.......
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Mallard No. 22
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Re: Last Album You Listened To?

Post by Mallard No. 22 » 28 May 2015, 06:57

AdvertBreak wrote:The JAMs (Justified Ancients of Mu Mu) was what The KLF called themselves when they started out.
I don't like much music of the late 80s, but The JAMs/KLF (& their other incarnations) are always interesting. They pointed the way in which music was going.
"Everybody's Doing It...So Do It Too...."

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TripleJay97
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Re: Last Album You Listened To?

Post by TripleJay97 » 28 May 2015, 09:01

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Very 80's! Not that that's a bad thing though, there's some great songwriting on there too.
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Rhys
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Re: Last Album You Listened To?

Post by Rhys » 28 May 2015, 09:31

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The Flaming Lips - Transmissions From the Satellite Heart

I love the band's later stuff like The Soft Bulletin and Yoshimi Battles the Pink Robots, but I'm not that familiar with their early albums, so I've been listening to them lately.

metalhipslop
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Re: Last Album You Listened To?

Post by metalhipslop » 28 May 2015, 23:23

just bought this actually

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Textin' abbreviates the brain. Aspirin takes away the pain.

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AdvertBreak
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Re: Last Album You Listened To?

Post by AdvertBreak » 29 May 2015, 01:38

TripleJay97 wrote:Very 80's! Not that that's a bad thing though, there's some great songwriting on there too.
Be sure to listen to the following albums if you haven't already. Neither are as good as Rattlesnakes but are both pretty underrated.

Anyway,
Show of Hands - Live at the Royal Albert Hall
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What can I say? Perfect album. Some people might tempted away by the overtly-traditional folk of some tracks, both lyrically and musically, but there is surely something for everyone here. The version of Day Has Come from this album is one of my favourite tracks ever, and then that's selling the brilliance of many other tracks short.

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AdvertBreak
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Re: Last Album You Listened To?

Post by AdvertBreak » 25 Jun 2015, 17:52

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When I was much younger, I never liked the Pet Shop Boys, which was largely influenced by the fact my parents can't stand them. Later still, I remember thinking their Brit Award for Oustanding Contribution was stupid and that Brandon Flowers was also, for, as he said at the time, choosing Discography over Louder than Bombs as a child, which no doubt I still find a confusing decision as there's an obvious winner between the two for me, but still. It was only in this decade I actually realised that not only was West End Girls a good tune, it was a great one. It was also then I realised that Ab Fab song I knew from Now 28 was the Pet Shop Boys in disguise, meaning I did like a PSB song when I was younger.

Skip forward to now, I don't dislike the Pet Shop Boys. I like them in fact, but not everything. I'm still not bothered much about their 80s albums, even though Introspective sounds like it could be an interesting listen, but I'm still unfairly biased against Always on My Mind for beating Fairytale of New York for the Christmas number 1 of 1987. The first Pet Shop Boys album I really like is Behaviour, where it seems Neil has picked up tips from his collaborations with Electronic. It's pretty great in fact, and Being Boring is a classic. But then 1993's 'Very' is shit. I can't stand it, although I like the packaging, the music videos and the rest of the promotion, but the album is too cheesy europoppy for me.

On one hand, I wasn't expecting 1996's Bilingual to be very good, as following Very, it could still have that eurotrashy sound mixed with, as I had read, Latin music, which could only end with something like Ricky Martin, right? On the other hand, I was hoping it was darker with more modern sounds, ala Ultra or Medazzaland, an album I had only just recently listened to. Well shit, it's my favourite Pet Shop Boys album! Fortunately, it's nothing like the former situation. It opens with the percussion heavy 'Discoteca' which then goes into 'Single' and I suppose like many, I thought they were the same track at first. Best of all, they sound pretty fresh and nowhere near as dated as previous PSB. These two are still my favourites. The album recalls previous PSB on other tracks but retains the fresh sound on, say, Electricity, containing a synth sound akin to certain big beat and what then passed for certain acid house/techno. The Latin vibes mean to me it isn't so obviously of its time. It could have been made quite a few years later, for example.

Wait I've written three paragraphs sorry I'm stopping now.

mr_spenalzo
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Re: Last Album You Listened To?

Post by mr_spenalzo » 25 Jun 2015, 20:06

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When it was released in 1995 Bowie's place in music was different from now: his 70's work was beyond suspicion. Uncles and dads would speak about amazing songs like "Heroes" (though they weren't keen on the dress Bowie'd wear). I'd play them Suede, and they'd remark on their debt to David. Older cousins, in the meantime, all had copies of Let's Dance next to the copies of So, Graceland and Brothers In Arms. But Bowie's contemporary work wasn't taken particularly seriously. Which seems weird now, because he'd just released his best album in ages, The Buddha Of Suburbia.

I was aware of him, and I remember my first introduction to his music was "Day-In, Day-Out". I liked the video in particular, probably thanks to the woman in her underwear; hadn't seen too many bra's at eight. I'd heard "Let's Dance", and some time later, around the time Freddie Mercury died I really loved "Under Pressure". Quite liked "Jump They Say". And early '95 I even got my hands on an album: on the back of the praise Bowie's back catalogue got from my musical heroes I purchased Changesbowie.

Outside was quite out of step with what was popular in the mainstream or "Alternative Nation", but Dutch rock magazine WATT published a 5-star review. Nine Inch Nails, whom I liked even though Trent didn't appear particularly cool, were mentioned. As was a guy called Scott Walker that I'd never heard of, but the record frequentlt mentioned to had a fascinating title: Tilt. I jumped in the deep end.

And didn't particularly like it. Some songs were good. The title track. "The Hearts Filthy Lesson", which would be on MTV. "Strangers When We Meet". And that was about it. Thought everything else sucked, and never listened to it again.

Until '99, when I was hit with Bowie fever. I got into Ziggy Stardust, then bought Low. I recall listening to Low in my cold and ugly room, and thinking, "so that is why people think Bowie is a genius!". I took Outside out of the CD tray for the first time in four years, and listened to it again, and again, and again.

It was my favourite post-70s album for a long time. I'd even ranked it as the third best Bowie album for a while (after Low and Station To Station). I wouldn't agree with either assessment anymore (for the record, I think The Buddha Of Suburbia is the better album), but it's still a phenomenal piece of work, and one of the few 75-minute CDs I'll listen from start to finish now and again. There's a few proper classics here: the title track, the suffocating "The Motel" with its beautiful Mike Garson piano playing), a nervous "The Voyeur Of Utter Destruction", "I'm Deranged"... I love the mania in Bowie's voice on "Thru' These Architects Eyes", and there's super creepy "Wishful Beginnings" (the way Bowie sings "I'm sorry little girl" might be the scariest thing on a Bowie album, and that's quite something once you realise that he's got "Sense Of Doubt" and "Chant Of The Ever Circling Skeletal Family" on Bowie albums). Even the segues, which are sometimes ridiculed even by folks that like the album, would be missed if dropped.

Bowie's status has changed in the 20 years since Outside, and rightfully so. But the crazy praise that (the straightforward rock of) The Next Day got would have been more appropriate for the two albums Bowie released between the autumns of '93 and '95. Can he do it again? A year ago I would have said "no", but that was before I heard "Sue (Or In A Season Of Crime)" and its b-side "'Tis A Pity She Was A Whore". Twenty years after my first proper Bowie experience he's still a mystery, capable of completely wrong-footing his biggest admirers.

*Edit* oops, that's longer than I'd intended.

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Miki
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Re: Last Album You Listened To?

Post by Miki » 25 Jun 2015, 20:55

Beck, Modern Guilt

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Track Listing:
1. Orphans
2. Gamma Ray
3. Chemtrails
4. Modern Guilt
5. Youthless
6. Walls
7. Replica
8. Soul of a Man
9. Profanity Prayers
10. Volcano

Beck's eleventh studio album (eighth without counting independent releases), Danger Mouse produced Modern Guilt (2008), continues somewhat the route began with its predecessor - The Information. Once again Beck allows himself to explore different genres and recording possibilities; electronica (Gamma Ray, Replica), neo-psychedelia (Chemtrails going where Tame Impala will go a couple of years later), rock-blues (Soul of a Man) and some retro-pop (Modern Guilt). The whole album sounds suspended between old and new, a kind of futuristic 60s sound. Beck's restrained vocals - caused by a spine injury which made it painful for him to sing - add to the sense of depth of the album, perhaps not Beck's most immediate or iconic, but certainly some of his most interesting (and to me underrated) work.

Highlights:

Orphans

Gamma Ray

Chemtrails - possibly my favourite track of the album. Joey Waronker's drumming is insane!

Modern Guilt

Volcano - another favourite of mine. Some of Beck's best lyrics of late.

Check also Modern Guilt Acoustic - as the name suggests, the acoustic re-recording of the whole album.

Modern Guilt also produced some awesome B-sides (the last Beck released) worth listening to

Vampire Voltage No 6, Bonfire Blonde, Half and Half, Necessary Evil
I've been drifting along in the same stale old shoes
Loose ends tyin' a noose in the back of my mind...

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TripleJay97
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Re: Last Album You Listened To?

Post by TripleJay97 » 18 Jul 2015, 18:57

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I was advised by a friend to listen to this album. I stayed over at his last night and I told him I'd never heard it, and he berated me Jack Black in High Fidelity style. He advised me to get up a page of all the lyrics while I listened to it and use it as a guide.

I haven't slept in 39 hours.

I have no more words.
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Lt Pinkerton
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Re: Last Album You Listened To?

Post by Lt Pinkerton » 18 Jul 2015, 23:36

Jay, The Antlers are an amazing band and so is Hospice. Check out their last two records, I think they're even better than Hospice although not as devastating.

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KingLouieLouie76
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Re: Last Album You Listened To?

Post by KingLouieLouie76 » 18 Jul 2015, 23:57

"Little Games" by the Yardbirds......It was very intriguing to see Jimmy Page transitioning them to obviously we know later became Led Zeppelin. I believe Jim McCarty could have remained as their drummer (but LZ obviously wouldn't have been the same minus Bonham's dynamics). Obviously, Page needed a more versatile singer than Relf (who was better suited for Blues and slower ballads).... Dreja just picked-up bass during that period, but they were already starting to use JPJ during their later sessions. Such a very splendid album and one to me that ranks w/the better 1967 releases, but just got overshadowed quite a bit back then!
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TripleJay97
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Re: Last Album You Listened To?

Post by TripleJay97 » 19 Jul 2015, 07:44

Lt Pinkerton wrote:Jay, The Antlers are an amazing band and so is Hospice. Check out their last two records, I think they're even better than Hospice although not as devastating.
I was in tears, man. It didn't help that I'd had a few ciders. They're a band I need to look more into, definitely
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