The Dave Clark Five

Other music and recommendations.

Moderators: tom_cas1, Caitlin, MrMagpie

Post Reply
User avatar
Mallard No. 22
Posts: 2464
Joined: 01 Oct 2014, 07:46
Location: North East UK

The Dave Clark Five

Post by Mallard No. 22 » 19 Feb 2015, 07:18

This documentary film is worth a look, although (being about Dave Clark, and produced by him) it leans heavily to self-promotion:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b0 ... d-all-over

The Dave Clark Five are overlooked as far as 60s UK artists go. Not helped by Clark himself withdrawing his records from commercial release for many years.

They did take all the good elements of other groups, without being particularly original in themselves.

But they had a workmanlike, powerful sound and on stand-alone terms their songs tend to sound good. :D
"Everybody's Doing It...So Do It Too...."

User avatar
KingLouieLouie76
Posts: 3223
Joined: 10 Sep 2014, 03:51
Location: Phoenix, AZ (USA)
Contact:

Re: The Dave Clark Five

Post by KingLouieLouie76 » 20 Feb 2015, 14:55

I've always liked them.... In fact, they were among my dad's favorite bands while he was in college back then (circa '64)....... They had a very distinct sound of their own...... "Because" was always among my dad's favorite songs and I fell in love w/that myself..... "Glad All Over", "I Like It Like That", and "Catch Us If You Can" rank among the best British Invasion era songs..... Just a really ace band that got overshadowed by their contemporaries!
Image

User avatar
Mallard No. 22
Posts: 2464
Joined: 01 Oct 2014, 07:46
Location: North East UK

Re: The Dave Clark Five

Post by Mallard No. 22 » 23 Feb 2015, 06:47

Yes I think so as well. They had a very powerful, beaty sound.

Dave Clark always had a commercial outlook whereas Mike Smith, vocalist & keyboardist, was a musical talent.

Clark withdrew the back catalogue, which he gained control of at an early stage, for many years. He waited until he believed the time was right (1990s) for a re-release, when he thought the audience might appreciate it once more. This has received criticism because the work was unavailable for a long time. Hence a lack of radio play and a low profile in the years since their success.
"Everybody's Doing It...So Do It Too...."

User avatar
KingLouieLouie76
Posts: 3223
Joined: 10 Sep 2014, 03:51
Location: Phoenix, AZ (USA)
Contact:

Re: The Dave Clark Five

Post by KingLouieLouie76 » 27 Feb 2015, 14:04

Mallard No. 22 wrote:Yes I think so as well. They had a very powerful, beaty sound.

Dave Clark always had a commercial outlook whereas Mike Smith, vocalist & keyboardist, was a musical talent.

Clark withdrew the back catalogue, which he gained control of at an early stage, for many years. He waited until he believed the time was right (1990s) for a re-release, when he thought the audience might appreciate it once more. This has received criticism because the work was unavailable for a long time. Hence a lack of radio play and a low profile in the years since their success.

They always seemed to receive quite a bit of airplay on the "Oldies Stations" over the years here in the States... But too bad Clark did what he did because the deeper cuts might have received more appreciation than just the mere hits....
Image

User avatar
Mallard No. 22
Posts: 2464
Joined: 01 Oct 2014, 07:46
Location: North East UK

Re: The Dave Clark Five

Post by Mallard No. 22 » 02 Mar 2015, 07:07

Yes, and this is why they are overlooked. They had the most appearances of a UK band on The Ed Sullivan Show. But I think that the TV people probably wanted The Beatles, Stones as first choice, and the DC5 were called up when these were not available.
"Everybody's Doing It...So Do It Too...."

User avatar
KingLouieLouie76
Posts: 3223
Joined: 10 Sep 2014, 03:51
Location: Phoenix, AZ (USA)
Contact:

Re: The Dave Clark Five

Post by KingLouieLouie76 » 03 Mar 2015, 07:54

Mallard No. 22 wrote:Yes, and this is why they are overlooked. They had the most appearances of a UK band on The Ed Sullivan Show. But I think that the TV people probably wanted The Beatles, Stones as first choice, and the DC5 were called up when these were not available.

Agreed...they honestly faded rather quickly because they couldn't reinvent themselves like bands you referenced...That's what essentially victimized bands like Herman's Hermits, Gerry & the Pacemakers, Billy Kramer & the Dakotas, etc....
Image

User avatar
Mallard No. 22
Posts: 2464
Joined: 01 Oct 2014, 07:46
Location: North East UK

Re: The Dave Clark Five

Post by Mallard No. 22 » 05 Mar 2015, 07:06

Herman's Hermits, The Dave Clark Five and Manfred Mann continued to be popular in the UK until the end of the 60s.

And whilst their records remained consistent in both standard and chart placings, I think there was an element of fulfilling their contractual obligations.

As epitomised by The Beatles, there was a general decline in touring after 1966. Much of this was down to safety concerns I'm sure. The crowds had become uncontrollable and many situations both inside & outside of venues were dangerous.

But these bands were still popular. They now developed their sound from the jingly jangly pop, or R&B, that had provided their earlier hits and was straightforward to play in the ballrooms in front of screaming fans.

In this later period, it became debatable as to how many of the band members actually played on the records. There was some overlap with session musicians as more precise playing was needed. Pure 'show-business' was changing into the 'music industry'.

Referring specifically to the DC5, their original UK run of hits had fizzled out after the 'Catch Us If You Can' single and film (1965). Clark had been influenced by the beat boom initially, and in the later 60s shrewdly observed other trends. The 'comeback' single of 1967, 'Everybody Knows' was a straight take of the MOR ballad epitomised by Engelbert Humperdinck or Val Doonican. If it hadn't been for Long John Baldry having a similar record at the time, the DC5 may well have been number one.

'Red Balloon' was pure '1968 Britpop' (if there can be such a term) - jingly jangly pop with prominent bass & brass. 'Put A Little Love In Your Heart' (1969) was a nod to soul, whilst 'Everybody Get Together' (1970) was a mini-masterpiece, taking the 'world peace, brothers & sisters' theme of the period with a great guest turn by Madeline Bell 8-)

Other beat groups had struggled from 1966. It may be noted that e.g. Billy J Kramer and Wayne Fontana continued to release singles, the standard of which was comparable to anything else. But for whatever reason the continued hits proved elusive.
"Everybody's Doing It...So Do It Too...."

User avatar
KingLouieLouie76
Posts: 3223
Joined: 10 Sep 2014, 03:51
Location: Phoenix, AZ (USA)
Contact:

Re: The Dave Clark Five

Post by KingLouieLouie76 » 12 Mar 2015, 12:50

Yeah...I'm getting at though most of those bands didn't remain relevant here in the States beyond 1965 (for the most part) and their deeper cuts never get played on today's Classic Rock stations.... The only exception of the "elite bands" that did secure sustained success would be the Herman Hermits with "There's Kind of Hush"...

Or, a couple of bands like the Animals and Manfred Mann had to practically make a drastic makeover and reinvent themselves in order to reestablish themselves.....

Perhaps I need to give later DC5 more of a listen than I already have.....
Image

User avatar
Mallard No. 22
Posts: 2464
Joined: 01 Oct 2014, 07:46
Location: North East UK

Re: The Dave Clark Five

Post by Mallard No. 22 » 13 Mar 2015, 07:12

The later DC5 work was comparable to anything else made for their target market. But like e.g. Herman's Hermits, Manfred Mann, The Tremeloes, probably 'UK-orientated' for TV and the family audience. If Mike Smith (or any other members) sought an on-going 'rock career', they would have had to leave and start a new project. And there was no certainty that this would be a success.

It can be difficult to tell why some UK artists were popular in the USA, and others not (& vice versa).

I think that in the mid 60s, the USA didn't have home-grown equivalents of the beat groups. It was a phenomenon that was unexpected (as it had been in the UK). The Beatles & Stones would be first choice, but following them Herman's Hermits, the DC5 would get the TV appearances because they were available. The Monkees were created to fill this void.
"Everybody's Doing It...So Do It Too...."

User avatar
KingLouieLouie76
Posts: 3223
Joined: 10 Sep 2014, 03:51
Location: Phoenix, AZ (USA)
Contact:

Re: The Dave Clark Five

Post by KingLouieLouie76 » 15 Mar 2015, 00:49

Mallard No. 22 wrote:The later DC5 work was comparable to anything else made for their target market. But like e.g. Herman's Hermits, Manfred Mann, The Tremeloes, probably 'UK-orientated' for TV and the family audience. If Mike Smith (or any other members) sought an on-going 'rock career', they would have had to leave and start a new project. And there was no certainty that this would be a success.

It can be difficult to tell why some UK artists were popular in the USA, and others not (& vice versa).

I think that in the mid 60s, the USA didn't have home-grown equivalents of the beat groups. It was a phenomenon that was unexpected (as it had been in the UK). The Beatles & Stones would be first choice, but following them Herman's Hermits, the DC5 would get the TV appearances because they were available. The Monkees were created to fill this void.
This is true..... During the mid-60s bands like the Beach Boys, Lovin' Spoonful, the Turtles, Jefferson Airplane, the Byrds, Mamas & Papas, etc all started to counter the British Invasion quite brilliantly....
Image

Post Reply