The Genesis Thread

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Re: The Genesis Thread

Post by MsMagicAmerica » 03 Oct 2015, 23:56

I wish they did more new wave actually
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Re: The Genesis Thread

Post by Mallard No. 22 » 07 Oct 2015, 03:45

AdvertBreak wrote:Pink Floyd coped best with punk. They made 'Animals'.

Or at least, that's what people term their punk rejection album. It came out in January 77, only one month after the Pistols Grundy incident.
Coming out at that date, I would say it was too early to be a punk reaction.

Though three years or so later, 'Another Brick In The Wall' was popular with the non-prog, youthful audience.

P.S: AB - you should finish your essay about older artists during the new wave period. It is a subject that fascinates me. Surprising how many rode through it at their peak, and were unblemished (Abba, ELO etc).
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Re: The Genesis Thread

Post by AdvertBreak » 07 Oct 2015, 18:52

Yeah I meant I thought it was too early for a punk reaction. It's just strange how the band say that it was.

And indeed Another Brick in the Wall fits into the category I meant by older bands making more accessible music during punk, which I'm sure is just coincidence. Taking their cues from disco instead.

I should finish the essay but I kept finding new things to add to it. :lol:

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Re: The Genesis Thread

Post by AdvertBreak » 12 Oct 2015, 01:22

I've finally got round to listening to the bulk of Peter Gabriel's solo stuff the last few days. I've dabbled here and there before, even listening to full albums the once and then somewhat forgetting, but I've really started to enjoy it.

The self-titled albums definitely show the progression from Peter Gabriel, flowerman of Genesis, to Peter Gabriel, world music loving star with much affinity for pop as for studio experimentation. I actually find myself agreeing with much of this primer of his discography on YouTube by Darren Lock, although in times I disagree.

Some of the first album, loved by many though it is, does suffer a bit from the sheen of the production. The Gabriel meets Fripp matchmaking on the second album is a definite improvement, production wise, and the songs are generally just as strong. The third album, his opus according to fans, is the one I've come back to the most, probably to make me like it more and more, although I am definitely impressed with it. Its surprisingly bleak, and when I think of it I think of its eclectic percussion, which is a good thing. Its also here where the worldbeat influence begins.

Peter Gabriel 4 is where the 80s pop tinge comes in, although here it is very fine indeed, bound with Peter Gabriel's artiness. With 'So' in 1986, his massive breakthrough, the world influence that he had built up is still pretty obvious here but the pop song writing has grown massively, although not at the sacrifice of the experimenting and arty music he is known for making. I must admit it's not all for me. Sure there are great tracks, Sledgehammer and Red Rain, but it takes a while to sink in I guess. It's very obviously from 1986, although it is nowhere near as dated as his former band's Invisible Touch from the same time. As has been pointed out, thats no thanks to the percussion. So opens up with a splattering of percussion from Stewart Copeland whereas Invisible Touch opens up with a Simmons electronic drum sound, played though it was by one of the greatest of drummers.

1989's Passion (soundtrack to the Last Temptation of Christ) is probably too ethnic for some. For me, even. I have nothing against new age as such. Sometimes its great (Watermark by Enya), sometimes its sooo bloody boring (The Songs of Distant Earth by Mike Oldfield). I guess the difference is guitar noodling, with Passion doesn't have. Instead it has the most of a world music influence his music would ever have.

The long awaited proper follow up to So, 1992's Us, remains underrated. Perhaps his most underrated album along with Up and Peter Gabriel 2. It has generally has a sullen moodiness, which can make for great music, and it does here. The poppier tracks doesn't stand up as much. As everyone knows, Steam is basically Sledgehammer 2, but its alright enough. I also like Kiss the Frog even though a lot of people don't like it. In short, even though it is 58 minutes long (same length as Mike Oldfield's Tubular Bells II from the same time), it doesn't feel long or like its taking advantage of the duration of CD by taking up its full capacity, which is what practically every other album by an old art/prog artist did in this era (Yes' Union, Pink Floyd's Division Bell, Genesis' We Can't Dance, etc etc). Love to Be Loved is perhaps my favourite as I like the, ur, mystical sound to the music.

Its accompanying tour gave us Secret World Live which I've played half of. And from what I've heard of it, it being a contemporary of Pink Floyd's Pulse also includes neither of them being particularly great.

With a largely vacant decade to follow when it comes to albums, barred only by the Millennium Dome soundtrack which I haven't heard (2000's Ovo) and the Rabbit Proof Fence soundtrack Long Walk Home, which I don't remember that well from when I watched the film, he finally arrived with 2002's Up. As I have already mentioned it was underrated. The long wait for it to arrive (a full decade) didn't help. Also the first single The Barry Williams Show is pretty shit, but the more sombre Gabriel returns and its glass production makes it very attractive to me.

I haven't heard anything after that, not there has been much. His cover album of songs by bands that then had to cover one of his tracks afterwards project sounds intriguing but I've heard its miss-mash. Not heard the orchestral remake album either. Or Big Blue Ball.

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Re: The Genesis Thread

Post by Mallard No. 22 » 13 Oct 2015, 06:49

I liked 'So' and its singles 'Sledgehammer', 'Big Time' and Red Rain'. Preferable as you say to the machined mainstream of 'Invisible Touch'.

I recently dug out the cassette and played 'Us' again. I found it a bit laboured, though I enjoyed the hit singles 'Diggin In The Dirt' and 'Steam', which I had liked at the time.
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Re: The Genesis Thread

Post by KingLouieLouie76 » 24 Oct 2015, 06:37

Mallard No. 22 wrote:I liked 'So' and its singles 'Sledgehammer', 'Big Time' and Red Rain'. Preferable as you say to the machined mainstream of 'Invisible Touch'.

I recently dug out the cassette and played 'Us' again. I found it a bit laboured, though I enjoyed the hit singles 'Diggin In The Dirt' and 'Steam', which I had liked at the time.
I definitely agree... but it seems though with the videos Peter was focusing more on style over substance to help revive his career and or to reintroduce himself to newer audiences.... I preferred songs like "Solsbury Hill", "Shock the Monkey", and even "In Your Eyes" off "So" really defines that album the other single releases.

I think he really followed what Genesis was doing during that time by really releasing simplistic songs but mainly emphasizing again style than anything else....
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Re: The Genesis Thread

Post by Mallard No. 22 » 24 Oct 2015, 07:39

Yes I agree about him trying to introduce himself to newer audiences.

He was the 'indie axis' of the Genesis family - whereas Phil & the others appealed to the 'married with children' audience.
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Re: The Genesis Thread

Post by KingLouieLouie76 » 24 Oct 2015, 22:38

Mallard No. 22 wrote:Yes I agree about him trying to introduce himself to newer audiences.

He was the 'indie axis' of the Genesis family - whereas Phil & the others appealed to the 'married with children' audience.

Phil's solo career really necessitated that Genesis moved in that direction or they would have broken-up several years earlier....Although, there always seemed to be at least 1-2 tracks per the 1980s albums they would recall some of their progressive sound....
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Re: The Genesis Thread

Post by AdvertBreak » 24 Oct 2015, 22:41

Peter has never really made a mainstream album since So. Sure, the successors have mainstream singles, but they still have 7 minute worldbeat or moody curveballs to set the record (as in album) straight (as in curved :p).

P.S. Solsbury Hill is not about Peter leaving Genesis but instead about Peter's love for Bath :P

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Re: The Genesis Thread

Post by KingLouieLouie76 » 24 Oct 2015, 22:43

AdvertBreak wrote:Peter has never really made a mainstream album since So. Sure, the successors have mainstream singles, but they still have 7 minute worldbeat or moody curveballs to set the record (as in album) straight (as in curved :p).

Agreed..very similar to David Byrne... but wish he'd finally consider reuniting w/the Talking Heads, but that's an entirely different subject obviously...

Phil was obviously 100% mainstream solo himself....but that's what kept him afloat.....
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Re: The Genesis Thread

Post by AdvertBreak » 24 Oct 2015, 22:49

I think Phil is underrated solo. I don't actually care for it at all spare Face Value and a few other tracks, but anyone who thinks Sussudio is the worst song ever doesn't know any songs.

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Re: The Genesis Thread

Post by KingLouieLouie76 » 25 Oct 2015, 22:29

AdvertBreak wrote:I think Phil is underrated solo. I don't actually care for it at all spare Face Value and a few other tracks, but anyone who thinks Sussudio is the worst song ever doesn't know any songs.

I love his duet with w/Philip Bailey, "Easy Lover" more than most of his solo output! "Sussudio" just got played out, but not his fault... was excellent enough at the time to merit that.... I love all his solo material as well because of the sentimental value..I can recall each song based on events that were going on in my life upon its initial release.... Just hope he will record something more in the future!
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Re: The Genesis Thread

Post by AdvertBreak » 25 Oct 2015, 22:38

I have that one album by him that doesn't have a face close up, Dance into the Light. People forget about that album when they are discussing where Genesis would have been in 1997 if Phil had stayed on. Calling All Stations is definitely weak, and did need Phil to tie things together, but Phil wasn't exactly at the best place either.

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Re: The Genesis Thread

Post by KingLouieLouie76 » 25 Oct 2015, 22:41

AdvertBreak wrote:I have that one album by him that doesn't have a face close up, Dance into the Light. People forget about that album when they are discussing where Genesis would have been in 1997 if Phil had stayed on. Calling All Stations is definitely weak, and did need Phil to tie things together, but Phil wasn't exactly at the best place either.
Yeah...that had no absolute business recording "Calling All Stations"... just as horrible as Van Halen recording w/Gary Cherone! "We Can't Dance" was brilliant....that would have been a better "swan song"!
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Re: The Genesis Thread

Post by AdvertBreak » 25 Oct 2015, 22:45

I suppose it's not poor Ray Wilson's fault. He's just the guy they got to sing it. He didn't write Inside or any of Stiltskin's The Mind's Eye (instead the band leader was the guy responsible for numerous TV jingles including BBC One's Rhythm and Movement idents 2002-06). Calling All Stations suffers from a lack of songs, really. Congo and The Dividing Line are quite good, and even Alien Afternoon dare I say so, but, well, this YouTube review from the man himself best re-addresses my criticisms. Its quite long though.

I agree, Genesis finished in 1996.

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